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Tag: language

Komorebi

It is delightful to discover words in other languages that do not exist in your own language. I found a collection of untranslatable words in this Medium article that first introduced me to the word komorebi 7 years ago. I immediately fell in love with the word that is used to describe sunlight being filtered through the trees or “the interplay between the light and the leaves”. It has a sense of discovery in it. There can be all sort of reasons for a word existing or not existing in a language, but that is not my point. I am just charmed by a word that can teach us to open our eyes and minds to beauty everywhere. Soon I was noticing komorebi all the time when out walking. When I visited Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum a few years ago, I realised that Bessie MacNicol, one of the Arts…

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The language of inclusion on a form

While surfing Twitter, I was drawn to this article because of its title: “Disability-smart customer service: handling difficult situations“. I clicked the link to get to the article, but I didn’t read it. I happened to scroll at the same time and ended up at the registration form section of the page. The form really caught my attention. After the usual name and email fields on the form, I saw a text box labelled “Adjustments”. Inside the box, placeholder text stated: Please tell us if you require any adjustments for this event e.g. dietary, access, assistance, alternative formats, interpreters or disabled parking I think using the term adjustments and the language of the placeholder text is neutral. This could be far less stigmatising than the label of “Disabilities”, “Accessibility”, or “Special Needs”, and much more inclusive. The article is on the Business Disability Forum website. The event for this registration…

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The Dictionary Evangelist

Two people shared this great link with me, and I made some technical editors happy by sharing it with them. Now I will share it here! Listen to Erin McKean talk about the dictionary in a presentation from TED. Yes, she talks about the dictionary and where it is headed – or not. It is hilarious and fun and full of ideas to ponder. She never flinches at new words the way technical writers can (when marketing turns a noun into a verb)! 🙂 I don’t think she would be offended if she saw how my 10-centimeter thick Webster’s New Twentieth Century Dictionary (Unabridged) raises my monitor on my desk. She’s probably think that was extremely practical. She loves books, as she declares in the video, but the inside is what is so exciting and dynamic that it may no longer fit the form that we are familiar with today.…

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